Glossary

Below are a list of some Git and CodeFactor specific terms we use across our site.

GPA

grade point average (or GPA) is a standard metric used in the United States to indicate overall academic performance. It is designed to be a single number that captures how well a student performed during a portion of their academic career.

CodeFactor uses a modified metric that used letter indicators combined with 1-10 numeric range:

Performance

Letter

Range

Excellent

A

9.4-10

Excellent

A-

9.0-9.3

Good

B+

8.7-8.9

Good

B

8.3-8.6

Good

B-

8.0-8.2

Satisfactory

C+

7.7-7.9

Satisfactory

C

7.3-7.6

Satisfactory

C-

7.0-7.2

Poor

D+

6.7-6.9

Poor

D

6.3-6.6

Poor

D-

6.0-6.2

Failing

F

0-5.9

Default Branch

The default branch is considered the "base" branch in your repository, against which all pull requests and code commits are made. CodeFactor needs to identify it in order to know which branch to analyze first.

By default this branch for newly imported repository will always be set to your default GitHub or Bitbucket branch.

Webhook

A webhook is what notifies us that someone has pushed a new commit into repository branch. For GitHub and Bitbucket repositories, a webhook is also what notifies us of a new pull request or changed branch. When we receive a notification, we’ll run a new analysis on the codebase.

Don’t see our service hook on GitHub or Bitbucket? You can manually re-install it by going to repository settings page and clicking Refresh on Integrations tab.

Code Churn

The number of times the source code file has changed in revision control repository. CodeFactor uses this metric to assign file grade as well as importance. NOTE: newly added Git repositories have their history truncated to 100 revisions.

Duplicate code

A sequence of source code that occurs more than once, either within a program or across different programs owned or maintained by the same entity. Duplicate code is generally considered undesirable since it becomes harder to understand and maintain.

Cyclomatic complexity

Measurement to see how difficult a computer program is to understand. Computed using the control flow graph of the program: the nodes of the graph correspond to indivisible groups of commands of a program, and a directed edge connects two nodes if the second command might be executed immediately after the first command.